Posts Tagged ‘richmond anarchists’

Join Richmond Copwatch at the 2011 Richmond Zine Fest on October 8th from 11 to 6 at the Gay Community Center of Richmond at 1407 Sherwood Avenue.

4pm- Know Your Rights Workshop with Richmond Copwatch
This workshop will help participants learn the basics of asserting their rights when dealing with the police. We highly recommend this workshop for EVERYONE. But especially anyone who engages in any level of political protest or demonstrations.This workshop consists of skits that are performed by Copwatch members and then edited by participants from the audience. We encourage participation, questions, and dialogue around the topics covered in the skit. We are not lawyers, but we are able to provide useful information about a lot of legal questions.

For more information about this workshop or Richmond Copwatch you can call 804 303 5449 or email sbhcopwatch@gmail.com
Richmond Copwatch is a non-hierarchical organization dedicated to ending police abuse. We believe that monitoring and recording police interactions with community members is a vital first step towards ensuring accountability and protecting ourselves and our communities. We are committed to anti-authoritarian principles and seek to transform the nature of the police and explore alternative methods of community conflict resolution.

Folks from the Cyberpunk Apocalypse Collective in Pittsburg will be in Richmond for the Richmond Zine Fest- the weekend of October 7-9th. That Sunday (post-zine fest) they will be performing a variety show at the Wingnut Anarchist Collective at 7pm (after Food Not Bombs).

Mr. God’s Galloping Mountain Variety Show!
The lineup: stand-up comedy by Gunner, fictional histories of Pittsburgh by famed hotdog reconstructionist and dog food millionaire Todd Faltin, heartfelt ballads and melancholic croonings by a soft-spoken New England gent, sci-fi role-playing by CpA founder DannyMac, and quiet noise interludes by Ken Kaminski! And… local acts?

The Cyberpunk Apocalypse (CpA) is a writers’ co-op in Pittsburgh. We publish zines, host readings and such, run a residency program, and write. Gunner’s just-published novel, Galloping Mountain, will be featured at the merch table for sale or trade, plus pretty music and zines!

http://cyberpunkapocalypse.com/

The Wingnut is at 2005 Barton Avenue and can be contacted at (804) 303 5449 or wingnut_collective@yahoo.com

This event is sober and all ages!

Richmond Copwatch is planning to continue its patrols of First Fridays in downtown Richmond in the month of October. Join us, meeting at the fountain in Monroe Park at 6pm on Friday October 7th. Bring cameras- video or still, cell phones, flashlights or headlamps, water and snacks if you have them. Please dress for the weather and with shoes you are comfortable walking around in for a couple of hours.

If you are able to, we recommend that you get in touch with Copwatch ahead of time for a Know Your Rights training and a brief How to Copwatch training. We will coordinate groups for that evening in the park, and also arrange for a group debriefing at the end of the night.

August was the first month we did an official patrol of the First Fridays event (after over a year of doing Copwatch in Richmond), and one Copwatcher had a tazer put in their face by a Richmond Cop. In September, a smaller patrol went out and was assaulted and harassed by the Richmond police, culminating in one member of Copwatch being arrested at the end of the night on bogus charges. We refuse to be intimidated by the illegal actions of the Richmond Police Department. The aggressive, illegal, and unprofessional behavior of the Richmond Police Department as a whole, simply goes to show the necessity of Copwatch, and the regular observing and recording of a police force as long as one exists. Beyond that the continued violent and oppressive behavior of many members of the Richmond Police Department goes to show the systemic nature of problems with police- problems that will be solved not through reform, but through abolition. As long as the police congregate on Broad Street to oppress and antagonize largely youth of color in order to maintain the gentrifying aspects of the First Fridays Artwalk, Copwatch will be there.

In October we will be doing patrols of this event, cameras in hand. If you are interested in joining us for the patrol, please get in touch, (more…)

Wednesday, September 7th, 8PM – at the Flying Brock Library (our friends) in Oregon Hill at 506 South Pine Street. We will be doing our usual Open Hours from 4-7:30 then biking on over to the Flying Brick for this event. Join us!

After a series of murders at the hands of the police last Winter, the city of Seattle was the ground for a surge of revolt beyond the control of both managed protests and state repression. After a long period of quiet, people broke years of inertia to interrupt the lie of social peace–and anarchists played a critical role in fueling the fires.

Two participants in these events will present their analysis of anti-police tension, the forces that maintain social order, and the strategies and tactics used by anarchists to deepen social rupture.

Afterward, we will have an open discussion about ongoing struggles in Seattle and Richmond, and potential points for future conflicts.

As always, Flying Brick events are sober unless otherwise noted. Please don’t bring any drugs, alcohol, or show up intoxicated. Thanks! Hope to see all of you there!

I was at home on Friday night, not participating in Copwatch due to other conflicting activities. The phone rang, and on the other end was Copwatch Member D, who quickly related that another member of Copwatch, M, was being detained by the police. D said that the police were not allowing them to get anywhere near M, and that because all of the Copwatch cameras had been placed in M’s bag, the police had them all. I got the location, called to Copwatcher X, and jumped in the car to get to the scene as quickly as possible.

Upon arrival we met up with D, and walked to the street where M was being detained. I walked down the sidewalk on Monroe Street, off of Broad (headed South). Quickly, 2 members of Richmond Police Department informed me that if I was going to walk down the sidewalk I would be arrested. I asked what for, and they said Obstruction of Justice.

I got into an argument with them, explaining to them the definition of Obstruction of Justice in Virginia, and how my walking down a sidewalk to observe and record the police did not count. Then the cop informed me that he had specific orders not to let the three of us down that street. This whole time other people were walking down the street. I informed the cop that what he was engaging in was illegal, selective enforcement, and a violation of our right to observe and record as well as move freely. He kept repeating that he would arrest me if Iwalked down the public sidewalk. (more…)

I was one of three  people present in Jackson Ward to observe police for the “cancelled” First Fridays art walk event. I met up with X and Y and we walked around distributing know your rights literature and keeping an eye on any police interactions. The night was going smoothly aside from occasional  demeaning comments from the massive groups of officers positioned at every block.

Walking west on Broad Street we saw a police officer interacting with a female in a car. X,  Y, and myself were filming from the side walk, giving the officer plenty of room to do his job. X brought my attention to two officers crossing the street heading straight towards us.  The officers approached us very closely and angrily  told us we were obstructing the side walk and had to walk away. They got toe to toe with us and began to push the three of us west on Broad. I ducked to the side to stand in the alcove of a vacant building while the officers passed, and began to follow X, Y, and the two officers from behind. As X and Y were walking backwards, so that they were able to film the officers, one officer began to deliberately kick X’s foot. The officer vocalized that if X touched him again that we would “get [him] an assault charge.” They  pushed us all the way to the corner of Broad and Belvidere where they briefly stopped walking, as did I. The aggressive officer told me that if I was on the sidewalk, I had to continue walking, so I stepped into the Hess station parking lot. He then began to aggressively  ask what my business was at the Hess and said that if I didn’t leave he  would arrest me for trespassing. At the corner there was also a couple that had been standing there before we arrived. the officers then told them they weren’t allowed to stand still on the sidewalk,  before walking back to the posts. The couple as well as us were dumbfounded. We talked and gave the them literature before continuing our patrol and passing out literature.

Eventually, there seemed to little activity and we were getting tired so we headed back to where our bikes were locked up. Stopping at my bike, about a block and a half East of where X and Y had thier bikes , we deposited out cameras into Z’s bag. I unlocked my bike and rode off. Shortly thereafter Z was arrested under very weird circumstances. Read the other entries to find out.

After a long and relatively uneventful night of doing Copwatch for first fridays on Broad Street, S and I were ready to make the trek back to the Wingnut to review the footage acquired over the course of the night. It had been an evening of very large groups of very bored pigs, standing in groups of up to ten up and down Broad St., most likely very upset that there were no younger folks of color to push around to pass the time on a Friday night. After a humorous impromptu interview with the 4th precinct commander, Mike Strawder, S and I had made it back to our bikes, parked in front of the New York Pizza restaurant. S had unlocked his bike, and as I bent to unlock my bike, I felt handcuffs close over my left wrist as another pair of hands closed around my right arm. I looked up, and there were at least 15 VCU and Richmond police officers surrounding S and I, and I was promptly told that I was under arrest and that I had a felony warrant out on my head, though they were not, at that moment, very forthcoming about what I the warrant was for. S jumped to his feet and immediately had his camera trained on the officers and myself, and watched as they moved me to an alley “where  no one could see me”. My pockets were searched, my knife confiscated, and my bag taken from me as two undercover agents kept their video cameras trained on me throughout the ordeal.

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The Wingnut held up well during Hurricane Irene over the weekend. We lost power, but had a generator to keep our sump pump in the basement going as well as a refrigerator.

Food Not Bombs on Sunday went off without a hitch, as folks gracefully adapted to the limited electricity conditions.  Which was really great, as other organizations who normally distribute food in Monroe Park were unable to due so on Sunday. There was a larger than usual crowd at the meal and grocery distribution.

Members of the Wingnut and friends also spent a good amount of time yesterday taking axes and saws to trees in our neighborhood that had fallen across the roads. We collected a lot of future firewood which is now in our yard. We have to chop all of this wood into wood stove size pieces over the coming days. Anyone who feels like getting their chopping on is more than welcome to come help out. (more…)

On August 13th the Central Virginia Food Bank showed up in Southern Barton Heights with enough food to provide for 200 households in our community. The event worked out, even though we all got a shower when it decided to pour rain right in the middle of the day! Here’s how it went:

Of the 200 vouchers handed out, 147 were handed in for food. In all, those with vouchers represented 280 adults, 277 children, and 95 seniors; accounting for 652 people total.

Having seen that there were some organizational issues to be worked out with how the Pantry has worked in the past, this month, we did things a little differently.  We have noticed over the last few months a trend in folks from Southern Barton Heights not receiving vouchers, while others from well outside of the neighborhood were receiving one, or even more. This is not to say that we don’t want other people to have food, on the contrary if it were up to us, we would live in a world where everyone had enough to keep themselves and those around them fed.  Sadly, we are only able to guarantee food for 200 families, which is by no means a small amount, but unfortunately doesn’t begin to scratch the surface of the issue of hunger in our communities. So, with that in mind, we have revamped the process by which we are handing out vouchers, in an effort to better serve our immediate community. If you have, in previous months, received a voucher for the event, yet you did not this month, please keep in mind that if you are outside of our range of delivery you will either need to contact us at 804-303-5449, or come to the mobile food pantry event the second Saturday of every month and sign up to have a voucher delivered to you.

We will be handing out semi-permanent voucher cards to people in the Southern Barton Heights area over the coming weeks as a solution to the voucher concerns.