Archive for October, 2010

The Wingnut Anarchist Collective is working in the Southern Barton Heights neighborhood to help facilitate community autonomy and solidarity. One of the things we have noticed and heard is that the community needs a place to come together. For those not familiar with the area, it is lacking in businesses or public spaces. There is 1 bar, 2 corner stores, and a garage. The area barber shop closed down months ago. Aside from the churches and the mosque in the neighborhood, there are not any public community spaces. There is no place for people to come together indoors to have casual conversations, play games, learn from each other etc. The Wingnuts have been trying to work on purchasing a second building for use as a community center. We have so far not had much luck- encountering people trying to hoard properties in order to get a much larger amount from people actively gentrifying/developing for profit, and banks who cater their sales to developers who purchase dozens of properties at once.
Our solution in the mean time is to start having open hours at the Wingnut. The Open Hours model is one similar to that of many radical spaces, including Oregon Hill’s Flying Brick Library. Our intention with open hours is not to compete with the Flying Brick, but to provide a more local space for our community to come together. We have tabled with fliers advertising the Flying Brick and found that while people in our neighborhood were interested in the idea when we explained it to them, Oregon Hill is too far to expect folks to go just to check out something they are unfamiliar with like a radical library. The history of Oregon Hill as a white neighborhood, with some avidly racist inhabitants, also makes the area less appealing to people from our neck of the woods.
Open Hours are just that- open. You are welcome to come hang out, look at books, work on a project, drink tea, talk, do your homework, write, play a game etc. You don’t have to want to engage in a particular activity to come use the space. Open hours are intended to create a community space. For both the Southern Barton Heights and the radical/anarchist community.
If you want to volunteer at open hours, get involved, donate supplies or books or snacks, just get in touch. We would love your participation! wingnut_collective@yahoo.com or 804 303 5449 or 2005 Barton Avenue

What can you expect to find at Wingnut Open Hours:

Wednesdays from 4pm-10pm
Fridays from 4pm-10pm

Radical Lending Library- (more…)

Some Wingnuts got on the TV talking about anarchy, community, and the upcoming election!

Mark on The Local Anarchists

Reporters from local radio station WRIR 97.3 came to the 2010 Richmond Zine Festival and interviewed a variety of zinesters as well as local organizers. It also includes a nice piece on the Flying Brick Library. Everyone who was interviewed did a really nice job talking about a variety of important issues.  Check it out! Support the Richmond Zine Fest, support WRIR, and support the Flying Brick!

The text from the story as well as links to groups mentioned can be found at http://www.wrirnews.blogspot.com

Please read this article and sign the petition about the parking of cars on Richmond’s African Burial Ground by VCU. This is a dramatic example of institutionalized white privilege and racism. Imagine the public outcry if VCU built a parking lot on Hollywood Cemetery. Parking on sacred ground is not acceptable, and it has only gone on for so long due to historical and current white supremacy and racism which infect most institutions and capitalist ventures. The Wingnut Anarchist Collective stands in solidarity with everyone fighting to end this disrespectful and oppressive treatment of a historical and spiritual site.

End VCU/MCV Parking on Richmond’s African Burial Ground

by: Kenneth Yates x370724

A place called Shockoe Bottom in Richmond, Virginia was once the center of the African slave trade in North America. However if you were to visit this area you would never know it. Beneath the night clubs, condominiums, office buildings, and streets lies a history grossly repressed by capitalist appetites for commercial development.

One hidden piece of history in particular lies beneath a parking lot publicly owned and utilized by the Virginia Commonwealth University & Medical College of Virginia staff and students.



Photo by: Kenneth Yates

 In 1992 local historian and author Elizabeth Cann Kambourian, while researching for a book about a local slave rebellion leader named Gabriel, discovered something. Around 1800, inspired by the Haitian Revolution which was in full swing at the time, Gabriel plotted one of the most organized slave revolts in United States history. The plan was for hundreds of enslaved Africans, free Blacks and a few whites to to enter the city of Richmond, take the governor hostage and demand the abolition of slavery in Virginia. The revolt, however, was crushed after an intense 100 year storm flooded the area, making it impossible for Gabriel and his army to enter the city.

With information given by one of Gabriel’s collaborators, the then Richmond Governor James Monroe formed a militia to hunt down Gabriel and his co-conspirators. Gabriel was eventually captured, tried and, on Oct. 10, 1800, executed at the town gallows, located in what was then called the Burial Ground for Negroes. At least 25 of his comrades met the same fate, either at the same site or in surrounding areas.

The burial ground was retired sometime around 1810, after hundreds, perhaps thousands of enslaved Africans had been buried there. The exact number is unknown. Before long the burial ground itself fell into obscurity, eventually buried beneath 10-20 feet of filler as the land took on many other uses over the years.

Kambourian discovered an old Richmond City map placing the African Burial Ground just north of 15th & Broad Street. That area is now partially covered by Interstate 95, with the remaining portion of the Burial Ground buried beneath a parking lot utilized by both VCU & MCV staff and students. The exact boundaries are yet to be determined.

The Virginia Defenders for Freedom, Justice & Equality have been fighting to reclaim this sacred ground from its present desecration. (more…)

Visit the new RVA Radicalendar site: http://rvaradicalendar.blogspot.com/ !

The RVA Radicalendar attempts to provide a resource for activists, socially conscious community members, and like-minded organizations to be informed about actions, events, and gatherings within our community, and to help build communication and connections between those groups in the spirit of mutual aid.

In addition to having up-to-date event information, ideally we would also like it to provide a resource to connect those who want to help in our community with groups actively seeking extra hands.

The RVA Radicalendar does not promote racist, sexist, homophobic, transphobic, or otherwise oppressive events or organizations. We hope that it will prove to be a valuable resource toward all of us working in solidarity!

The Anarchist Black Cross will be presenting a screening of the new film  Justice On Trail: The Case of Mumia Abu-Jamal on Friday November 5th at 7pm. If the weather is nice we will be projecting the movie outside, so bring a blanket to snuggle under. If the weather is not so nice we will show the movie inside near our new woodstove! After the movie there will be the opportunity for discussion as well as resources for anyone interested in writing Mumia a letter. The regular monthly Richmond Anarchist Black Cross meeting will be happening on November 9th at 7pm.

The Wingnut is located at 2005 Barton Avenue, and can be contacted at 804 303 5449. All Wingnut events are sober and all ages.

This is a new movie that is coming out just in time for the very important November 9th court date of Mumia.Much thanks to the Defenders for making this movie available for screening. Anyone who can’t make this event should see if they can make the November 1st screening at the Flying Brick.

Oral argument scheduled, United States Court of Appeals

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit has just granted oral argument in Mumia’s case. (Abu-Jamal v. Beard, No. 01-9014.) The arguments will be before a three-judge panel on November 9, 2010, 2:00 pm. This will be in the Ceremonial Courtroom, U.S. Courthouse, 6th & Market Streets, Philadelphia. (more…)

The Richmond Food Not Bombs group got a really sweet surprise in the mail this past week. The San Francisco Food Not Bombs group, which has various friends in Richmond mailed RVA Food Not Bombs a solidarity package.

They had heard about the current campaign to keep Monroe Park, where Richmond Food Not Bombs has served a weekly meal for almost 17 years, open. Understanding that struggling against state and class/race oppression to maintain a Food Not Bombs community meal is important, San Francisco sent Richmond some solidarity. The package included, stickers, a vegan cookbook, a San Francisco FNB shirt, and some money to go towards the Monroe Campaign. It is also pretty clear that there was a lot of love in that envelope as well.

Thanks San Francisco! We love you back!

The Wingnut’s Bi-monthly craft night on November 3rd at 7pm will be a time to make fliers, banners, signs, etc. around the campaign to keep Monroe Park open and accessible throughout construction. Anyone attending the Novemeber 4th ‘community conversation’ organized by 2nd District City Councilman Charles Samuels is encouraged to come.
Please bring supplies if you can- posterboard, banner material, paint, brushes, but still come if you don’t have any of these things. (more…)

3 Wingnuts attended the National Day Against Police Brutality Rally held last Night (October 22nd) in Shockoe Bottom. The rally was organized to take advantage of the InLight event happening in that area. About 12-15 people attended the rally, holding banners and a black flag. One person read some statements about police brutality in our communities, and who and why the police are mostly oppressing. Then the group read off the names of people who had been murdered or brutalized by the police.
The InLight Festival goers were sometimes interested, but others were aggressive and very upset. Some told the protesters that they just wanted to look at art. But the Richmond rally was meant to bring the reality of police brutality to people who do not experience it in their daily (privileged) lives. The rally was essentially questioning why some people should be privileged enough to go and look at art and not stop and think about the people who have suffered at the hands of the police.

October 22nd is recognized as National Stop Police Brutality Day – A Rally is set for 8pm in downtown shockoe slip – bring a sign, wear all black, bring yourself and show support – email duronchavis@gmail.com for details

Meet us at 11th & Main Street!!